Lacrosse Equipment List Reviews for 2022 [Top Rated Products]

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Lacrosse is a trendy youth sport in the United States, particularly among boys and girls. It has gained widespread popularity that it is currently the fastest-growing major sport in the United States, outpacing all other major sports combined. Since its inception by Native American tribes competing against one another in the early 1800s, lacrosse has been a sport enjoyed worldwide. Following this initial success, it has gained enormous appeal among young people across the United States, especially in California. As a high-intensity sport requiring a great deal of physical effort and agility, lacrosse demands players to be on their toes at all times. As lacrosse’s global presence increases, it is now most popular in the United States and Canada. Still, it is gaining popularity worldwide as the sport’s international presence grows.

Putting in the required effort is essential before achieving success on the playing field. Starting with ensuring that you have all of the equipment required to play in the game, you can begin to prepare. This list of lacrosse equipment is designed to assist you in understanding what you will need to become a lacrosse player.

BOYS LACROSSE EQUIPMENT LIST

STICK

Synthetic materials are used to build lacrosse sticks, including composite, metal alloys, wood, nylon, plastic, and any other kind of synthetic material that can be thought of. Beginner lacrosse sticks range in price from $35 to $50, and they are available from several different brands and retailers. When it comes to starting lacrosse sticks, there isn’t much of a difference, but make sure you buy a boys’ lacrosse stick to be on the safe side. Mesh pockets are used on boys’ posts, whereas thread and leather thongs are used on girls’ sticks to make the pockets on the girls’ posts. This is an excellent suggestion for first-time purchasers. First-time purchase guidance is available on our blog, and we also offer information on the correct size. There will be no fiddlesticks or little sticks in this game.

HELMET

All field players and goalkeepers must wear this piece of equipment on the field. Helmets are not needed or recommended in our camps and clinics until boys reach the third grade, but we recommend that you double-check with your local lacrosse program to be sure. It is recommended that you try on various helmets to decide which one best fits your requirements. It’s essential to be comfortable in your skin. A not adequately fitted helmet offers just the bare minimum of protection. Goalkeepers are obliged to wear neck protectors linked to their helmets when on the field.

MOUTHGUARD

Players in the third grade and above are obliged to wear mouthguards at Swax Lax Lacrosse. Check with your local lacrosse program to see if they have any limitations on mouthguard use. Mouthguards that are more durable and long-lasting than standard mouthguards are available from companies specializing in custom manufacturing and are thus more expensive. Traditional mouthguards, which can be bought at a sporting goods store and molded with hot water at home, may also be used. They are a more cost-effective option for younger players due to their lower cost. Traditional mouthguards are also available for purchase online. It needs to have a distinct hue to be recognizable.

CLEATS/TURF SHOES

When playing on grass or turf fields, many players wear cleats to protect their feet. Cleats from soccer or football are allowed; the cleats do not have to be lacrosse-specific. Most schools do not allow cleats to be worn inside since they may cause damage to the gym floor and other surfaces.

GLOVES

All field players and goalkeepers must wear this piece of equipment on the pitch. In general, we need players in the 3rd grade and above but check with your local lacrosse program for a particular age and grade requirements. Gloves may not be cut or altered in any way without the express permission of the manufacturer. Try on many pairs of shoes to get the right fit.

PADS

All field players and goalkeepers must wear this piece of equipment on the pitch. In general, we need players in the 3rd grade and above but check with your local lacrosse program for a particular age and grade requirements. Gloves may not be cut or altered in any way without the express permission of the manufacturer. Try on many pairs of shoes to get the right fit.

  • Wearing this item of equipment is mandatory for all field players and goalkeepers. In general, we need players in the 3rd grade and above but check with your local lacrosse program for particular age and skill requirements. If gloves are cut or changed in any manner, authorization must be obtained from the manufacturer. Try on several different pairs of shoes to get the perfect fit.

BALLS

Maintain a supply of game balls and Swax Lax balls available so that you may train and practice at any time and from any place at your convenience.

BAG

Participants should bring a large bag (but not one that is so large that they would be unable to carry all of their stuff) to all practices and games in which they will store all of their equipment, including their uniform.

APPAREL 

Prepare for the whole season by stocking up on lacrosse apparel and equipment. Start with the basics you’ll need for practice, such as T-shirts, practice shorts, and socks, before expanding into more fashionable items. Complement your practice and game attire with a couple of pairs of compression shorts, and stock up on baselayers and sweaters in case the weather turns chilly during the first few weeks of the season.

GOALIE GEAR 

To play between the pipes in lacrosse, you’ll need a few more pieces of protective lacrosse goalie equipment. When you are permitted to use the same helmet as you use in other positions, you must attach a neck guard to offer extra protection while in this position. You’ll also need a chest protector to protect your torso from high-velocity shots, as well as protective goalkeeper trousers to wear beneath your shorts to protect your legs from high-velocity blasts. Shin guards are not necessary, but if you want to wear them, they may help you avoid painful bruises on your lower legs in the future. As previously mentioned, you may want to consider goalie-specific gloves, which have extra padding on the thumb and fingers to provide additional protection.

Cleats

To play between the pipes in lacrosse, you’ll need a few more pieces of protective lacrosse goalie equipment. When you are permitted to use the same helmet as you use in other positions, you must attach a neck guard to offer extra protection while in this position. You’ll also need chest protection to protect your torso from high-velocity shots, as well as protective goalie pants to wear under your shorts to protect your legs from high-velocity blasts. Shin guards are not necessary, but if you want to wear them, they may help you avoid painful bruises on your lower legs in the future. As previously mentioned, you may want to consider goalie-specific gloves, which have extra padding on the thumb and fingers to provide additional protection.

GIRLS LACROSSE EQUIPMENT  list

STICK

Unlike other sports, lacrosse sticks are made of various synthetic materials with a head connected at one end. These materials include composites, metal alloys, wood, nylon, plastic, and any other type of synthetic material with a head attached at one end. Starting at $25, beginner lacrosse sticks are available from several manufacturers, including STX Sports, Under Armour, Warrior, and Brine. It’s not difficult to tell the difference between beginner lacrosse sticks, so make sure you get a women’s lacrosse stick while you’re out shopping. It is particularly appealing to first-time purchasers because the girls’ sticks’ pockets are made of string and leather thongs, while the bags on the boys’ sticks are made of mesh. Advice for first-time buyers, including how to choose the proper size, may be found on this website. There will be no fiddlesticks or little sticks in this game.

GOGGLES

There are a large number of businesses that manufacture eyewear. It is suggested that your daughter tries on a couple of different goggles to see which one is the most comfortable for her face shape. We do not need goggles until the third grade and above at Swax Lax Lacrosse, but please check with your local lacrosse clinic or program to ensure they are necessary. We have a significant number of pairs of shoes available for loan, so don’t be worried if you wish to put off purchasing them until you are confident that your daughter will continue to engage in sports for the foreseeable future.

MOUTHGUARD

Mouthguards are required for all 3rd grade and higher players at Swax Lax Lacrosse, but please verify with your local lacrosse program to ensure that they meet their standards. Mouthguards that are more robust and last longer than conventional mouthguards are available from businesses specializing in custom-made guards. Traditional mouthguards, which can be purchased at a sports goods shop and molded with hot water at home, can also do the job and are a more cost-effective alternative for younger players due to their lower cost.

CLEATS/TURF SHOES

Many players prefer to wear cleats on grass fields, while on turf fields, they prefer to wear regular sneakers or turf shoes. Soccer cleats are permitted; the cleats do not need to be specially made for lacrosse. Lacrosse sticks are allowed. Most schools do not allow cleats to be worn inside since they may cause damage to the gym floor and other surfaces.

GLOVES

Even though they are not required, some ladies like to wear them all year long, while others prefer to wear them just during the season’s colder months. It is recommended that the gloves have some kind of grip on them to prevent the players’ hands from sliding down the stick.

SHIN GUARDS

Only goalkeepers at the youth and high school levels are needed to have this certification; field players are not required to have this certification.

BAG

It’s recommended that players bring a bag (but not too large that they cannot carry their gear) to all practices and games to store all their equipment.

BALLS

Keep several game balls and Swax Lax balls handy for training and practicing anytime, anywhere.

Sample Costs of lacrosse equipment

Men’s Lacrosse sticks: $30-$300

Even though they are not needed, some women choose to wear them all year long, while others prefer to wear them only during the colder months of the season. It is recommended that the gloves have some kind of grip on them to prevent the players’ hands from sliding down the stick.

Heads: $70-$200

They are made of plastic and come in various colors and patterns. For novices, the stick’s face is more prominent, and the scoop is broader, which makes it easier to pick up and catch the ball in the first place. Advanced posts have a range of features that vary based on where the player is located, their playing style, and degree of ability. It is unnecessary to use the goalie stick, but the head must be at least 6 12 inches in height and at least 10 inches in length, measured from ball stop to top of the head, to be considered legal.

Mesh: $10-$30

Hard Mesh, Soft Mesh, and Traditional are the three primary pocket options available. Inexperienced players will benefit from Soft Mesh since it makes capturing a pocket with little effort easier. Complex mesh is the most often utilized because it creates a more homogeneous bag and a harder throw than soft mesh, making it the most effective. The traditional is made of nylon thread and four pieces of leather, and it is pretty sturdy. On the other hand, standard pockets may provide a more sumptuous feel for the ball in the stick, but they need frequent maintenance that is sometimes beyond the skills of a beginner or intermediate player.

Handles: $50-$250

Each pocket arrangement is available in three different types of mesh: complex mesh, soft mesh, and traditional woven. Inexperienced players will benefit from Soft Mesh since it makes capturing a pocket with little effort easier. Complex mesh is the most often used because it produces a more homogenous bag and a harder throw than soft mesh, making it the most effective of the three types of mesh available. In the traditional, nylon thread and four leather pieces are used to construct the bag, which is very durable. On the other hand, standard pockets may provide the player a better feel for the ball in the stick, but they need more regular cleaning and upkeep.

Helmets: $250-$300

Helmets are composed of many components, including the shell, the face mask, the chin strap, the visor, and the chin strap. When buying a helmet, the most crucial factor to consider is whether or not the helmet will fit properly. Before leaving the store, ask the staff to double-check that the helmet is correctly suited to your head and body. NOCSAE certification is needed on the rear of all lacrosse helmets. This certifies that the helmet meets the particular protection standards for lacrosse players and coaches. Generally speaking, all lacrosse helmets are intended to provide the same degree of protection. When purchasing a helmet, the weight, features, and overall feel are all considered. If your child is currently in high school or will be entering high school within a year or two, make an effort to buy helmets in colors appropriate for their school to prevent having to purchase another helmet in the future. When buying used helmets, use great care and ensure no loose components, rivets, or bolts.

Elbow Pads: $25-$150

In addition to the shell, a helmet is equipped with a face mask, chin strap, chin strap adjustment, and chin adjustment, among other features. When buying a helmet, the most crucial factor to consider is whether or not the helmet will fit properly. Before you leave the store, ask the staff to ensure that the helmet is correctly fitted to you. All lacrosse helmets must have the NOCSAE certification on the back of the helmet. In this case, it means that the helmet meets the protection standards particular to lacrosse. Protective lacrosse helmets all perform in the same manner for providing protection. The price of a helmet is influenced by many factors, including its weight, features, and overall feel. Take care to choose helmet colors appropriate for your child’s school, mainly if they are in high school or will be entering high school in the next year or two. As a result, you will avoid buying a second helmet in the future. When buying used helmets, exercise great care and thoroughly inspect them for loose components, rivets, and bolts, among other things.

Shoulder Pads/Chest Protectors: $30-$180

One of the essential reasons lacrosse players wear shoulder pads is to protect their collar bones from being struck by a stick. Various types of places are available, ranging from the bare minimum (which just covers the collar bone) to high-tech areas that protect the wearer’s shoulder, upper arm, front chest, and back of their shoulders. Shoulder pads are designed to offer protection for the upper chest, collarbone, shoulder, and forearm when appropriately used. For about $30-$40, they may be bought and beneficial for the vast majority of youngsters who have not previously suffered from a shoulder injury. Football shoulder pads are not advised because they do not allow for sufficient mobility above the shoulder.

Gloves: $80-$200

Because it is the only piece of equipment that links the player to their stick, it is most likely the second most essential piece of equipment behind the bar in terms of importance. Lacrosse gloves protect the hand from being hit by a bar and the ball during a game. Protection, flexibility, and materials are the most critical elements in determining price differences across pricing points. Gloves for entry-level jobs are composed of a tough fabric, while gloves for higher-end jobs are coated with synthetic leather to increase durability. Gloves are available in four standard sizes: 8″ for a 1-3rd grade, 10″ for 4-6th quality, 12″ for 7-10th quality, and 13″ for adults. Because everyone’s hand is different in size, these are just approximations. Make sure your kid tries on the glove before purchasing it to ensure that it is the right fit.

Mouth Guard: $1.50-$100

Purchase a mouth guard that is compatible with the helmet. It will prevent your kid from losing their cool on the playing field. A player cannot participate in a game without one.

Cup/Supporter: $20-$80

It’s very straightforward and can be found at most sports goods shops. While no one will be checking up on your kid on this, don’t allow them to go outside and play without it.

Cleats: $30-$150

If your kid already owns soccer cleats, you should continue to use them. They’re going to work just great. Regarding footwear, fit and comfort are the essential characteristics to consider, not price—looking for a lacrosse-specific cleat? Look for anything with a speed cleat in the toe and heel areas (cleat directly under the toe). Football cleats are the most popular kind of footwear. Baseball cleats should be avoided at all costs.

Must Need Lacrosse equipment for Every Player

Even if you are a beginner or an experienced player, the following items of lacrosse equipment are necessary for everyone who wants to be a great lacrosse player. Although not always the most cost-effective choice, the purchase of secondhand equipment may provide you with superior equipment for a lower price. As is true of any activity, higher-quality equipment may sometimes be prohibitively expensive; nevertheless, secondhand equipment that has been well cared for enables athletes of all skill levels to benefit from excellent equipment without breaking the bank.

Helmet

Lacrosse helmets have traditionally only been worn in the men’s game, but women recently introduced a soft version to make the game safer. Cascade, STX, and Warrior make the best helmets. The most popular models are the Cascade S, Cascade R, STX Stallion, and Warrior TII.

When searching for a helmet, be sure to select NOCSE certified (National Operating Committee on Standards of Athletic Equipment). Make sure your helmet fits correctly so that you’re well protected and have a clear line of sight on the field.

Are you looking for a little extra “swag”? Grab some custom decals for your helmet, or buy one from your favorite college team.

Lacrosse Stick

One piece of equipment will contact the ball, and that piece of equipment is your stick. The length of the posts varies depending on their location. The NCAA mandates that midfielders and attackmen use short positions, 40-42 inches in length, including the head. The size of a goalkeeper’s stick may vary from 40″ to 72″. The length of defenseman sticks may range from 52″ to 72″. You’ll also need to buy a mesh-wrapped head to complete the look. It is possible to order mesh separately if you have access to a lacrosse store nearby or a friend who is familiar with the process of stringing a stick. Still, most people prefer to start with a “factory strung” complete rod (shaft and head together) to be ready to use the moment you receive it.

Shoulder Pads

Since lacrosse is a contact sport, it goes without saying that you should get a high-quality set of equipment. Shoulder pads will be required for players to protect them from checks and balls. Defensemen often wear smaller pads than attackmen, but it’s important to get equipment that fits tightly against your body and completely protects your sternum and collarbone, among other things. Additionally, many players prefer to wear rib pads, although they are not obliged to do so.

Cleats

Cleats are essential if you intend to play on grass or turf since soccer is the quickest game on two feet and demands players to cut swiftly. Many players choose to use mid-level cleats, comparable to those used in football.

Customers will also have to pick between cleats formed from plastic and cleats that are removable. When playing on dry grass, moldable cleats are preferable; nevertheless, detachable cleats may be utilized in a broader range of situations since various cleats can be connected to multiple parts of the shoe’s sole.

Gloves

On the pitch, all players must wear gloves to protect their hands, fingers, and wrists. Choose gloves that are less than a half-inch from the tips of the fingers so that your hands are covered. Cuffs somewhat larger on specific gloves are designed to protect your wrists, while goalie gloves include additional thumb protection. The palm material is usually considered the most critical factor in the overall quality of the lacrosse glove. It will give the most natural feel over the stick since it is made of the highest-quality material available on the market. Conclusion: there are alternative materials, like Nash and Mesh, that are durable but do not offer the same comfort level as leather.

Mouth Guard

Concussions may be prevented by wearing mouthguards at all times while on the field, which is mandated by law. To keep the mouthpiece in place while sprinting up and down the field, it may be custom-molded to suit your mouth perfectly. Choose an agent that not only protects you from head and mouth injuries but also fits well enough so that you can breathe comfortably and communicate with your teammates while on the field.

Lacrosse Equipment Buying Guide

If you’ve learned about the finest starting kits available on the market, you may be wondering which one to choose for yourself or your kid. We’ve compiled a list of factors to consider while deciding which gear set to select. Read on for more information.

1) What Equipment You Need

Maintain a constant awareness of the equipment required to make it onto the field: a helmet, shoulder pads, arm guards, gloves, and a stick for boys, and goggles, and girls’ bars for females. Most leagues will not allow you to participate if you do not own any of these things.
It’s important to remember that they may supply you with some of this equipment if you’re joining a new team. As part of their uniform, most competitive teams will provide you with a helmet and, in some cases, gloves to wear. Before purchasing a piece of equipment, check with your team to verify what (if anything) is already in place.
Depending on what you’re supplied with, you may want to modify your kit selection to include just the items you’ll still need from the basics to participate.

2) Fit

It is impossible to emphasize how critical it is to get the proper, comfortable fit for your young player’s equipment. An adequately fitted pad and helmet improve your child’s mobility while also ensuring their safety, which is essential.
To ensure that your kid gets the most excellent fit possible, most of the items mentioned in this article contain a sizing guide. You can check also Best Softball Pants For Plus Size.. You may consider purchasing an alternative set if your chosen kit does not have the right size for your needs.

3) Stick

The majority of the sets mentioned above contain a whole stick; however, not all are of the same quality or skill level. Some of the posts on this list are shorter and lighter in construction, making it more straightforward for novices to control the ball. More robust handles and high school-legal heads that are sturdy enough to withstand the demands of higher-level, more physically demanding competitive lacrosse are also available as alternatives.
Because of the differences between the STX Junior and Youth sets, it is easy to see how different they are. The Junior kit includes an STX 6000 series handle, which is by far the best quality handle on this list, and ahead with a narrower face, which is designed to accommodate more experienced players. The Stallion 50 from the Youth set is a shorter beginning stick with a lighter frame that would not hold up (or be legal) at the high school level. It is available in two sizes.
It may be beneficial to read reviews of the whole stack, or even just the individual head and shaft included, to have a better sense of the quality of the product and who each is most suited for.

4) Weight

Your comfort level and preferences will evolve as you get more and more familiar with the game, particularly when it comes to things like the weight of your equipment. Generally speaking, the lighter a piece of equipment is, the more susceptible it or you are to breaking.
Lighter sticks provide the user with more control, but the wrong check or fall may easily send you back to the store to get a new shaft or head for your stick. In contrast, heavier bats may be difficult for young players to handle, thus restricting their growth.
You must find a proper balance based on your age, size, position, and preferred style of play, among other factors.
To monitor opposing players without having to worry about their sticks breaking, defensive players typically choose heavier sticks. A midfielder may opt for a lighter shaft and a more rigid head to handle the strain of face-offs and the inevitable ground ball scrum between the two defensive boxes. An attackman may find it helpful to have a lighter stick that can be used all over the crease for rapid releases.

5) Customer Reviews

Read customer reviews (like we’ve done to create this guide) to understand better the quality of the sets you are considering.

Who better to learn from than the people who already bought the product? Reviews can be invaluable in finding information that may not be included in the product listing.

Customer reviews often mention things like fit, comfort, and safety. Does the stick break easily? Do the gloves fit a little tightly? Do the arm guards often slide down?

If any issues like these arise, someone likely wrote about them in the customer reviews.

6) Budget

The author of this essay began by emphasizing how difficult it may be to get started in lacrosse. Aside from the uncertainty about the equipment, the expense is undoubtedly another surprise for many new lacrosse parents.
When it comes to a younger athlete just beginning out, it is advisable to budget for your kid based on their first enthusiasm in the sport. If this is simply a test run, using a less expensive kit may be preferable.
However, always bear in mind that the lower the cost of the set, the shorter the expected life span of your equipment will be. Having to update or replace your lesser equipment as you go through your lacrosse career may end up costing you more money in the long run.